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-down in america's defense. the obama administration declared yesterday the president plans to depart from these precedents. secretary of defense gates and secretary of state clinton announced the president will not use nuclear weapons against any nonnuclear state even in the event of a chemical or biological attack. beyond that the united states will not develop any nuclear weapons. our enemies must be rejoicing. it could it be more clear this president's desire to deter enemies pales in comparison to bring about his desire for a nuclear free world? how dangerous is this for the united states and the free world? joining me newt gingrich. newt is the co-host along with his wife calista of the new documentary, nine days that changed the world. which is about pope john paul's pilgrimage to poland in 1979. mr. speaker, welcome. >> good to be with you. >> sean: how about bad is this? >> i think this is the most unrealistic diplomacy since the late 20s. you have to go back to the kellogg pact to end war the whole serve yeast -- series of disarmament con tprofrpbss in the 20s the democracies doe
that outlines a balanced, comprehensive approach to dealing with the role of nuclear weapons and america's national security. >> the nuke liar posture review. the review focuses on three types of weapons of mass destruction. nuclear, biological, chemical. first nuclear. if a country uses a nuclear weapon against the u.s., a u.s. retaliatory nuclear strike is an active option. second, biological, chemical weapons of mass destruction. if a country were to attack the u.s. with a biological or chemical weapon, a u.s. nuclear strike is off the table. if two conditions are both met. one, the nation attacking the u.s. with germs or chemicals has no nukes. two, the same nation attacking the u.s. with germs or chemicals was ostensibly abiding by nuclear nonprolifera commitment. secretary of defense gates outlined the u.s. nonnuclear response to a biological or bot conditions are memet. >> if any state eligible for this assurance were to use chemical or biological weapons against the united states for its allies or partners, it would face the pros secretary of a devastating conventional military r
and doing well at this. but at the same time all the countries in the me john know america plays an indispensable role and we'd like america to continue to do that. >> rose: a conversation about china, the united states, asia, and the world with the prime minister of singapore when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: singapore's prime minister lee hsein loong is here. he is in the united states this week for the nuclear security summit and for meetings with american officials, including the secretary of state. he's been prime minister since 2004, he's only the city state's third prime minister. he is the son of lee kwan yue, singapore's founding father. i am pleased to have him back on this broadcast with me while he's making this visit to washington. welcome. >> hello. >> rose: tell me what you think was accomplished at this summit of 46 nations. >> i think president obama did the world a service. this is an issue, nuclear security and nuclear terrorism which is important but not urgent. it's
in america and reduce our dependence on middle eastern oil. but that is not the policy we have. the president has the epa out there trying to bully the country. we are turning the other way and saying, c none saying dispositionap and trade energy -- we are turning the other way and saying, none of this past and trade energy tax -- cap and trade energy tax. the president followed that up with a $1.9 trillion increase in the national debt. increased the credit card of the country. we had already maxed out the credit card, but the president said that was not enough. he wanted to double down. he created a government takeover of health care. the bill grew and grew and grew. there were backroom deals analyzed a -- and lies. before they passed it, they had to have a reconciliation bill to fix the problems of the first bill before it was even signed into law. the health care czar has the authority to take your health care away from you even if you like it. what are we doing with all of these czars? get rid of them in. [applause] you have literally got a shot of government running around. you have c
world that it is more dangerous to be america's friend than it is to be our enemy. and i fear very much that in the age of obama that's proving to be true. now, the president's approach to nuclear disarmament which he also unveiled this week confirms the naivity of his views about america's enemies. until this week, any enemy of our country that might be contemplating a chemical, biological or large scale conventional attack against us knew they might face the worst in return, a nuclear response. we have now surrendered that powerful deterent. the new strategy prevents america from building any more nuclear weapons or using our nuclear deterrents to defend our allies against a massive conventional attack. apparently the president believes that if america stops its weapons production program the iranians and the north koreans will follow suit. [laughter] and while the president works to limit america's freedom of action, the iranian mullas are making steady progress toward acquiring a nuclear weapon. the president likes to say he's doing everything possible to prevent that from happening
to take that hill. [applause] secondly, to win back america, to win back the american congress for the american people, we needq)4 to campaign s conservatives. [applause] to face the enormous challenges ahead, we do not just need a majority of republicans on capitol hill, we need a conservative majority on capitol hill. [applause] we need men and women committed to fight for a strong defense, for limited government, and for traditional american values without apology and without acrimony. i am conservative, but i am not in a bad mood about it. -- we need to find happy warriors. men and women that will go into every neighborhood regardless of race and creed and color. our idea is no boundaries in america. jack kemp taught me that. [applause] lastly, we have to show the american people that we know what is at stake. we need to offer a compelling vision for a better america, grounded in the timeless principles of the declaration of independence. as well as the constitution of the united states of america. [applause] despite the political gains of the past year, america is changing
in kind. when we come back, the census, is it a civil q & a or a big brother snoop? somewhere in america... there's a home by the sea powered by the wind on the plains. there's a hospital where technology has a healing touch. there's a factory giving old industries new life. and there's a train that got a whole city moving again. somewhere in america, the toughest questions are answered every day. because somewhere in america, more than sixty thousand people spend every day answering them. siemens. answers. is counted. >> 48 years old, old man. >> the u.s. census is in full census mode. the census profiles the population of the country. census forms have been sent to 120 million households. the bureau wants americans and legal residents to give their most personal information, name address, marital status, income, date of birth, race. even illegal aliens are encouraged to fill out a confidential census form, and they have been given the assurance that their anonymity will not be disturbed by the census taking. census information will be used to determine where federal funds should go and
. america is at a critical pope of decision making. we are a nation at a crossroads. it is up to each of us to determine what kind of country we want to be. down one path is a democratic $1 trillion overhaul. a stimulus law that fails to meet expectations for job creation. the taxpayer-funded bailout for private companies. a cap and trade policy that will impose a massive energy tax upon all americans. all of these are costly policies that seize more control over the economy and our lives. the goal -- to remake america in the image of europe. but, take hope, down the other path is responsible, adult leadership, focused firmly on job creation and economic opportunity. we believe in a congress that will once again listen to the people and return america to the country they know and love. we believe in a limited, but effective government, that provides a safety net for those who need it most, but sets no limits on opportunity or achievement. we believe that it is not enough to just talk about ending government waste. you have to take action so that we can begin to be raised our deficits and fr
america that the political landscape is about to shift? let me give you my thinking on this. what i think we see happening is a change of who we are. see, america is not a country that is based on an ethnic heritage. america is an ideal. you can go and be born in louisiana and move to italy -- i have lived there 50 years and you will never be italian. when my grandfather came to america from italy, he became an american. [applause] . founding documents. we hear a lot about founding documents. i am talking about different founding documents. the founding documents upon which our founding documents were based for the judeo- were based for the judeo- christian we are the people of western civilization founded upon the bible. we believe in the dignity of every human person because we are created in the image of god. we believe in the collective ability of free and virtuous people to do more for our society them a benevolent, authoritarian government in betwoinstowing rights upon us. [applause] we believe in free markets and free enterprise. we believe in power of the individual. we beli
like never forget, miners keep america's lights on. but then saying we've got to not let this happen again. and so we expect to hear the president say we can't bring back the lives of these 29 miners lost. we can do everything possible to avoid such a tragedy happening in the future. alex? >> and the president doing so on the heels of at least getting a little bit of a break with his wife there in north carolina. we weren't given a lot of details about what they were doing. they want to have the press following them around but seems like a good break for them? >> reporter: the press was able to follow in the motorcade, kept at a little bit of a distance but every now and then you got a glimpse of them. the president and first lady went without their daughters but they were able to spend time with friends who flew in from chicago so they've had dinners and golf and that sort of thing. >> a little grown-up time. athena jones at the white house. >>> msnbc will air the president's remarks at the memorial, our coverage begins at 3:00 p.m. eastern for you today. >>> a newly released group
this to a mass audience than anyone in america. next to barbara, we are pleased to have chris hayes, the washington editor of "the nation" magazine. he has written in lots including "the american prospect." we are very pleased to have this panel. what we have for tonight is a very conversational format. my colleague, mike kazin and i will inform questions for our panel, but we really want to engage our questions and each other and then after we have had a chance to do that for a little while, and we would like them to engage with you. there is a microphone in the center aisle. after we have had a conversation, i invite you to line up at the microphone and asked were questions to the panel they go again, we are so pleased to have you for this discussion tonight. i think i have said enough at this point and i will turn it over to my colleague, michael kazin. >> thank you. i want to thank joe and the initiative for helping to sponsor this and putting this together. also, to joanne. well, the first question on the table on the leaflet is what is the state of the labor movement today and
and jeff sessions, republican of alabama. >>> then america's role in the world. how will this week's agreement on nuclear disarmament make the country safer? why are so many friends and foes alike defying the united states? our conversation with secretary of state hillary clinton and secretary of defense robert gates. >>> finally the roundtable takes on the growing left-right divide over the president's leadership, the congressional elections and the politics of the court. columnist for "the new york times" david brooks, chief washington correspondent for "the new york times" david sanger, syndicated "washington post" columnist kathleen parker and former democratic congressman from tennessee and chair of the democratic leadership council, harold ford, junior. >>> first, the politics of the supreme court. the president has another big decision to make, the second court vacancy in two years. how are the white house and republicans weighing the confirmation battle ahead? joining us to talk about that exclusively, two members at the heart of the debate, senate judiciary committee, chai
in america... there's a home by the sea powered by the wind on the plains. there's a hospital where technology has a healing touch. there's a factory giving old industries new life. and there's a train that got a whole city moving again. somewhere in america, the toughest questions are answered every day. because somewhere in america, more than sixty thousand people spend every day answering them. siemens. answers. >> chris: joining us now one of the more controversial figures in politics these days, but a favorite among tea party conservatives. minnesota congresswoman michele bachmann who comes to us from saint paul. congressmanwoman, welcome to "fox news sunday." >> thank you, chris wallace. thank you so much. >> chris: back in the 2008 campaign you famously said that barack obama may have anti-american views and then you quickly expressed regret for those comments, but the other day, you took back your apology. i want to put it up on the screen. you said -- congresswoman, why the switch? and do you really believe the president of the united states has anti-american views? >> well
, look those in new york's 21st district, including my own family, to the president's family, america stands next to poland in mourning. the solidarity of the polish people in their grief is an inspiration to us all. my thoughts and prayers are with the families who lost someone. thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from oregon rise? >> to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. defazio: the obama administration has steadfastly refused to contest the tariff of $2.4 billion levied by mexico because congress terminated the cross-border trucking program due to serious safety concerns. there is no drug testing in mexico. there are no hours of service requirements in mexico. there are no meaningful commercial driver's licenses issued in mexico to know what the record of these drivers are. congress overwhelmingly voted to terminate that program. but it's rumored the next month when the president of mexico comes, the obama administration will open the border to mexican trucks. jeopardizing the
to america us -- to "america's newsroom". martha: that's going to get a lot of attention. good morning, bill, good morning, everybody at home, i'm martha maccallum, the obama administration has already sort of shunned the phrase the war on terror, so widely used burg the -- during the bush administration. sources say this new change in the language, wee moving that word, islamic, with references to terrorism is really to demonstrate that america does not view all muz im countries through the prism of terror. bill: that's the theme president obama has pushed since taking office. the critics are questioning the strategic benefit, what do we get from it. melanie wilkes is in washington. what are the changes from the white house now? >> reporter: this attempt to move away from equating muslim countries with terrorism began a year ago when the president spoke in cairo, promising a new beginning to relations between the suts and muslim countries. now his advisers reportedly want to remove terms like islamic radicalism from a document called the national security strategy. the associated press is r
, thank you so much. i'll be back with final thoughts on this in a minute. somewhere in america... there's a home by the sea powered by the wind on the plains. there's a hospital where technology has a healing touch. there's a factory giving old industries new life. and there's a train that got a whole city moving again. somewhere in america, the toughest questions are answered every day. because somewhere in america, more than sixty thousand people spend every day answering them. siemens. answers. ♪ [ male announcer ] every business day, bank of america lends nearly $3 billion dollars to individuals, institutions, schools, organizations and businesses in every corner of the economy. america. ♪ growing stronger. every day. in the north of england to my new job at the refinery in the south. i'll never forget. it used one tank of petrol and i had to refill it twice with oil. a new car today has 95% lower emissions than in 1970. exxonmobil is working to improve cars, liners of tires, plastics which are lighter and advanced hydrogen technologies that could increase fuel efficiency by up
with outrageous waiver. monica crow by on that. ten minutes away. "america live" starts now. megyn: we begin this hour with a big fight shaping up on capitol hill. a fight over a bill to extend jobless benefits. senate debate opens in about an hour with democrats insisting on passing the bill now and republicans demanding that congress find a way to pay for it. and here's why. as of friday the total outstanding public debt topping $12.8 trillion. $12.8 trillion. look how long that number is, look at that. but it gets more dramatic. that number has grown by $485 billion in just the past two months. congress spending more than it takes in by a rate of almost $250 billion a month. james rosen has more on that live in washington d.c. hey, james. >> reporter: yeah. it's no way to balance a checkbook, megyn. this is one of those votes coming up later today that could leave an incumbent exposed to his or her challenger in a midterm election year because each with polls showing americans are very concerned about deficit is spending, no one wants to be seen opposing the helping hand for une
of limiting america's use of nuclear weapons, 25 percent say they support the policy, 20 percent, undecided. you can count former vice presidential candidate sarah palin along with those who do not like the plan for nukes, here's what she had to say about it on hannity the other night. >> unbelievable, unbelievable, no administration in america's history would i think have ever considered such a step that we just found out that president obama is supporting today. that's kind of like getting out there on the playground, a bunch of kids, ready to fight, and one of the kids saying go ahead, punch me in the face and i'm not going to retaliate. megyn: the president, firing back, when abc news asked him about palin's warning -- remarks, mr. obama taking a bit of a shot at the former alaska governor. take a listen. >> i really have no response to that. last i checked, sarah palin is not much of an expert on nuclear issues. if the secretary of defense and the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff are comfortable with it, i'm probably going to take my advice from them, not from sarah palin. megyn:
kelly, this is "america live" anmonday and we've got breaking news this hour on the man picked up with a gun after asking to see the president, initial reports say joe mcvey never got near obama but now we're learning he got a whole lot closer than you think, and -- >> i'm innocent of every single allegation, i look forward to my day in court. megyn: big questions in the court case involving former illinois governor rod blagojevich, is president obama now in trouble on this one? "america live" looks for answers on all that and lindsey lohan right now. >>> we begin with a fox news alert, brand new details into the arrest of a north carolina man who police say wanted to talk to president obama. with a loaded gun strapped to his waist. we are just getting the details now from a court appearance for 23-year-old joseph sean mcvey, this is his mug shot, look at this kid, he looks like a kid! police arresting him after he allegedly drove up to the airport where air force one had just taken off and asked security if he could talk to president obama. while police initially said that mcvey
states of america, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. and if you will now remain standing, it is my delight as a mother to introduce you to a young woman will be singing the national anthem. ♪ >>oh, say, can you see, by the dawn's early light, what so proudly we hail'd at the twilight's last gleaming? whose broad stripes and bright stars, thro' the perilous fight, o'er the ramparts we watch'd, were so gallantly streaming? and the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air, gave proof thro' the night that our flag was still there. o say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave o'er the land of the free and the home of the brave? ♪ [applause] great. ladies and gentlemen, that was fantastic. can we have another round of applause? [applause] >> this is a great honor for me. i am new to the stage in national politics. but i would like to say that this is the opportunity of a lifetime, because i believe the event that we are all at today is the first event on the path to taking back the congress of the
a smarter planet. somewhere in america... there's a home by the sea powered by the wind on the plains. there's a hospital where technology has a healing touch. there's a factory giving old industries new life. and there's a train that got a whole city moving again. somewhere in america, the toughest questions are answered every day. because somewhere in america, more than sixty thousand people spend every day answering them. siemens. answers. ♪ [ male announcer ] every business day, bank of america lends nearly $3 billion dollars to individuals, institutions, schools, organizations and businesses in every corner of the economy. america. ♪ growing stronger. every day. >>> >>> coming up next the "roundtable" and sunday fun nis. . funnies. " >>> you know, with my work as a contributor on foxnews an my new tlc reality show, "sarah palin's alaska" just seemed the most logical state is launch my own network. do you hate gotcha journalism? hey journalist, i gotcha. or i make it look like they were wh woefully unprepared. >> so, katie, what newspapers do you read? it's an easy question, katie. >
, reject it. from new york. from new york. good night, america. captioned by closed captioning services, inc >> bret: next on "special report," arizona prepares to step up evident against illegal immigration. the president prepares to make his case on wall street for new regulations. one group prepares to try to find a way to dig out from massive national debt. live from the studio in washington, this is special report. good evening. i'm bret baier. we begin outside the beltway, in arizona, where a tough new immigration law awaits the signature of the governor. it sparked high emotion. the sponsor says it takes the handcuffs off police and puts them on violent criminals. but one catholic archbishop compares it to nazi and soviet-style repression. correspondent william la jeunesse looks at both sides of the issue. >> protests outside the state capital in phoenix. calls for arizona governor jan brewer to strike down the toughest illegal immigration bill in the country may fall on deaf ears inside. brewer known for her conservative views is expected to sign the bill this week. key move sol
afghanistan. maybe because america is less affected by these problems and russia and europe are suffering more. this is the drugs that go to our countries. and we should achieve a greater progress on that. we have similar approaches on the meast settlement. we need to create necessary conditions to -- for the creation of an independent palestinian state. so far, we are facing a lot of difficulties. until then, we cannot expect a durable and sustainable peace in the middle east. so far, the united states is taking vigorous efforts to recover the constructive process , including through proximity talks. we totally support this idea and this year, i have met with almost all of the middle east leaders. i supported indirect faux. we hosted the meeting in moscow and i hope eventually it will lead to direct negotiations. any stop in the development always brings about lagging behind. that is why our country started modernizing its economy and started the technological innovation introduction. so far, frankly, speaking, we haven't done that much. and frankly speaking, here, we would like to count on t
, these are international travel, but this is both are countries very connected to america. it's more than a u.s.-led effort. it is a u.s. effort with assistance from around the world. particularly, the mexicans really fear, last year was h1n1. this year, it's the drug war. that there really is unease among the americans, which is the tourist, which feeds the tourist dollars into the country, so this visit is very helpful just simply by showing that the first lady has no problem going to mexico and you shouldn't either. >> and the message out of the summit, here we are, all of these countries getting together with president obama. what has really been accomplished, chuck? >> i think historically, he's brought 46 world leaders here. it was supposed to be 47 and netanyahu decided not to come. >> it's the first time since 1945. >> bringing attention to nuclear terrorism. i think they seem to struggle to get the focus. they didn't -- when you hold a summit like this, your job is to sell it. up until yesterday, they were struggle to get a focus. getting john brennan out there and talking about nuclear terrorism
night, america. captioned by closed captioning services, inc >> jim: the latest in the tragic coal mind accident. president bam has change in nuclear policy and iraqi president warns not to leave too soon, saying now is too soon. live from the studio in washington, this is "special report." good evening. i'm jim angle in for bret baier. the top story tonight, the efforts to find survivors and remains from the worst u.s. mining disaster since 1984. 25 miners are dead, four others are missing. the blast occurred monday at the massey energy company sprawling upper big branch mine about 30 miles south of charleston, west virginia. we have live fox team coverage in a few minutes. first, a new nuclear policy for the u.s. for decades, the u.s. has protected itself and its allies leaving open the possibility the u.s. would resort to nuclear weapons if necessary. now president obama says he is changing that, narrowing the circumstances as well as nations that might be threatened by the use of nuclear weapons. white hou correspondent mike emanuel has story from the pentagon. >> reporter: four top
on the coal industry. he's also the author of "big coal, the dirty secret behind america's energy future." thanks for joining me. what can you tell us about the people of the company that own this mine? we're looking at information coming in. 57 citations in a month? is that normal? >> yeah. well, no, it's not normal. and massey energy has a long history of safety violations. both in underground mines and in other kinds of violations in their larger surface mines also. they're really one of the most kind of notorious coal operators in. >> after sago, we thought things were going to get better. have they not? >> well, you know, there have been some modest improvements since the sago mine explosion and tragedy of a few years ago. then, of course, we had the utah mine tragedy. and every time there's lengthy investigations, and every time there's lots of recommendations. and every time those recommendations are put off, watered down and they're just not as tough as they should be. >> are they not as tough because the coal mines industry is very powerful and those who support it especially in
of people that represent many -- represent america as a way to look at the nominee. >> reporter: in an effort to build on the bipartisan meeting he reached out by phone to nine additional senators on the committee, including three republicans. despite the best effort to build consensus, republicans say there are critical philosophical differences to make it impossible. >> i don't believe judges should be empowered to redefine the meaning of our constitution, of our statutes, to enhance the government power, to intervene in a lot of different areas. >> reporter: the president said he hopes to announce a nominee by the end of may. tonight we are getting confirmation about another name in the mix. judge williams of seventh circuit, african-american who was first nominated to the bench by president ronald reagan in 1985. then elevated to the appellate level by president clinton. she is a graduate of wayne state university and notre dame law school and she used to be a music teacher. >> bret: okay. add her to your nominees potential book. >> will do. >> bret: thanks. federal law enfo
of the challenges we face internationally can't be solved by one nation alone, but i do think that america's leadership is important in order to get issues on the international agenda and to move in concert with other countries to have an effective response. there are a host of other issues obviously that have to be addressed. and one of the points that was made during this summit is we're talking here about the instruments of potential war or terrorism, but obviously, there are also the reasons, the rags nal, excuses for conflict that have to be addressed as well. i remain committed to being a partner with countries around the world and in particular, hot spots around the world, to see if we can reduce those tensions and resolve those conflicts. and the middle east would be a prime example. i think that the need for peace between israelis and palestinians in the arab states remains as critical as ever. it is a very hard thing to do. and i know that even if we are applying all of our political capital to that issue, the israeli people, through their government, and the palestinian people t
of america and we'd like to make them all obsolete and get rid of all of them across the entire fruited plain and the whole world. here's the thing, that's one of the things that makes us unique. that's what makes us the superpower. aren't we giving away the store by going down to zip? >> yeah, i mean, even if you want to get to zip, the united states needs to maintain a strong, credible deterrent because we need a bargaining chip in the discussions with the russians and the chinese. >> and president obama would like to see zero nuclear weapons in the world. >> he certainly does and the problem is, as i said, the russians and the chinese are not buying on to his vision. we have a fundamental disconnect between the united states. on the one hand, the russians and the chinese in addition to the iranians and the north korea koreans. >> here comes hillary. >> is she there? >> yeah. >> what do you think about that? >> certainly, you know, gates, i think, certainly wanted to be there for iraq. he also wanted to be there for modernization of the pentagon which is an important issue for him, to r
. and today, we know it's small businesses that can create the jobs america needs. that's why at&t is investing billions to upgrade and build out our wired and wireless networks. making them faster, smarter, and more secure. connecting small businesses to markets across the country, and around the world. we invest now, because we know it will pay off... with new jobs, new growth, from a new generation, putting their belief in the future on the line. now is the time for investment and innovation. the future is waiting. and the future has always the future is waiting. and the future has always been our business. at&t. >>> next on this week in defense news on the eve of the president's nuclear security summit we talk about the administration's nuclear arms control agenda. >>> now this week in defense news with vago muradian. >>> good morning and welcome to this week in defense news. i'm vago muradian. the 2010 international military conference gets under way tomorrow in tanzania. we talk to the hiv-aids program how it affects u.s. security. >>> we look at the president obama's ambit
your job. >> guest: it's my job and and my team's job to drive innovation it into america's foreign-policy and figure out how we can maximize the potential of technology and innovation and service of america's diplomatic goals. >> host: give us the example? >> guest: i will give a couple quick ones, they vary from things doing in mexico to the condo to siberia. in in siberia, for example, we have a strategic dialogue with russia and if you think about the cold war innovation and with something they competed with the russians on and, in fact, if one of our nation's one it was perceived as though the other was losing and now innovation can be a shared resource. scientific and tough logical operation -- cooperation. we're building ties between the new russian government, the private sector and american governments and american private sector so by working together leveraging each resources we can produce scientific and technological breakthroughs that otherwise would happen. that's a positive example. another side ofñr it is fighting against bad guys and dealing with some of the threa
, america is bracing itself for what to become one of its worst ecological disasters. >> auto show opens to the press today ahead of the official opening on tuesday. among 19 new vehicles been launched with foreign manufacturers alternative piece of the booming chinese market. the country had almost no private class 15 years ago. lester come over to u.s. to become the biggest auto market. the olympic and 400 or mediumetr champion has tested positive for steroids. he plans toblames it on an over- the-counter male enhancement products. back to you. >> thank you. for the first time, surgeons have performed what they're calling a full face transplanted the operation was carried out in spain on a young man who has been unable to swallow, speak, or breathe properly after farming accident five years ago. the death of another man and a road accident has been his lifeline as an interface has been donated and now transplanted. the plastic surgery and burns unit in buffalo. joining me is our medical correspondent. first of all, talk us through. with some computer-generated pictures of this operatio
provides 35% of the world's supply of coal and roughly half the electricity used in america is generated by coal. that takes nearly four tons of coal a year for every man, woman and child. at the heart of the coal industry are nearly 50,000 people who work in active underground mines. what we know for sure about that is that the pay is good but the families of these miners and the miners themselves know that these jobs come with significant risks. here's national correspondent jim axelrod. >> reporter: the families who depend on the upper big branch coal mine are trying to gather their strength in the face of this disaster. >> i'm worn out. just still so sad. >> reporter: benny willingham would have been 63 years old in five weeks. he planned to retire on his birthday after 30 years in the mines and take his wife on a cruise. instead his family will now bury him. >> we lost a great man. my uncle was a great man and... >> reporter: it's a risk they've been taking for generations. the average coal miner here makes $73,000, more than double the wage of other industries in west virginia. >>
it taken off your hands, we'll bring it to america and robert gibbs says yes. he says it's safer in the united states and anywhere else. there will be safety concerns because you have to store is it safely in the united states but robert gibbs says americans will be feeling safer if the loose nearby materials are in the united states as opposed to to places that don't have the security the white house and administration will provide. >> major, thank you. >>> as i mentioned, the united states did not include north korea and iran on the guest list for the nuclear summit. you may recall these two countries have something in common other than animosity toward the united states. both have active nuclear programs. north korea has tested successfulfully at least two atomic bombs. the united states and allies say iran has been working on nuclear weapons for years but they insist the program is simply for peaceful energy and medical purposes. jonathan hunt is live with more. how are north korea and erin racketing? >> two different reactions. north korea saying absolutely nothing, probably
troubling. >> well, they're generally troubling, mika, because the united states of america, after nine years in afghanistan, after two commanders in chief, still have no exit strategy. now, of course, the things we were supposed to have learned from vietnam and the beirut tragedy was you never go into war until you have an exit strategy. the only semblance of an exit strategy, mort zuckerman, that we have is that we will stay there, and young americans will continue to die. and american taxpayers will continue to spend billions and billions of dollars a year. so we can prop up the government of hamid karzai. hamid karzai. that -- this man, who is contemplating joining the taliban -- which, by the way, i say let him do it. they've got a 10% approval rating anyway in afghanistan. he is our exit strategy. so if you're a mother or a father or a wife or a husband whose loved one is in afghanistan right now going out on patrol with the possibility of being injured for life or killed, you're doing it for a man who says he's thinking about joining the taliban. >> well, i don't think i would de
damage with most of the blame falling on the boy scouts of america. >>> to the breaking news out of florida where an 11-year-old girl has been found alive after she had gone missing friday near a florida swamp. when they found nadya, she said, quote, i can't believe you rescued me. nbc's mark potter is live in winter springs, florida, with the story. mark, we're happy that they rescued nadya. but tell us what her condition is now. i know she was taken to the hospital for some treatment and observation. >> reporter: that's right. she's in the hospital now. she is being treated. she's being questioned by police. and those police are now telling a story of how she was found. the police chief here in winter springs says at 8:30 this morning officials got a call from a man named james king who said he had just found 11-year-old nadya blum in a deeply wooded area that has not yet been searched by police. they were able to triang late his cell phone call and pinpoint the location. it took officers more than two hours to get there. once they were notified. because the underbrush is just
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